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Different habitat salinity between genetically divergent groups of a worm-like goby Luciogobius guttatus: an indication of cryptic species

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/57539

Title: Different habitat salinity between genetically divergent groups of a worm-like goby Luciogobius guttatus: an indication of cryptic species
Authors: Hashimoto, Seiya Browse this author
Koizumi, Itsuro Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Takai, Kotaro Browse this author
Higashi, Seigo Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Biogeography
Blakiston's line
Convergence
Distribution
Phylogeography
Mitochondrial DNA
Issue Date: Oct-2014
Publisher: Springer
Journal Title: Environmental Biology of Fishes
Volume: 97
Issue: 10
Start Page: 1169
End Page: 1177
Publisher DOI: 10.1007/s10641-013-0206-7
Abstract: Gobies of the genus Luciogobius have unusual morphological adaptations to interstitial rocky coastal habitats in far eastern Asia; an elongated scale-less body, the loss the first dorsal fin, and a drastically increased number of vertebrae. Convergent evolution makes the species distinction difficult and the existence of many cryptic species has been postulated. Two divergent lineages of L. guttatus had been reported with the possibility of niche differentiation between marine and brackish habitats. Here, we quantitatively assessed the water salinity of the habitats used by the two lineages in Hokkaido, Japan, as well as their morphology. One lineage occurred exclusively in high-salinity habitats in intertidal zones (> 25 aEuro degrees) and the other occurred mostly, but not exclusively, in low-salinity habitats near river mouths (< 5 aEuro degrees). This result, together with mtDNA molecular phylogeny, suggests that the brackish type might have originated from a marine ancestor. Two lineages occurred sympatrically on some shores. No apparent difference was observed in the external morphology between the lineages, whereas the number of vertebrae was significantly different. Our results support the preposition that the divergent lineages within L. guttatus represent cryptic species.
Rights: Published online: 13 December 2013, ©Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013. "The final publication is available at link.springer.com"
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/57539
Appears in Collections:環境科学院・地球環境科学研究院 (Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 小泉 逸郎

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