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Interaction between patch area and shape: lakes with different formation processes have contrasting area and shape effects on macrophyte diversity

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Title: Interaction between patch area and shape: lakes with different formation processes have contrasting area and shape effects on macrophyte diversity
Authors: Soga, Masashi Browse this author
Ishiyama, Nobuo Browse this author
Sueyoshi, Masanao Browse this author
Yamaura, Yuichi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Hayashida, Kazufumi Browse this author
Koizumi, Itsuro Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Negishi, Junjiro N. Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Area-shape interaction
Edge effect
Floodplain lake
Macrophyte assemblages
Management
Oxbow lake
Issue Date: Jan-2014
Publisher: Springer Japan KK
Journal Title: Landscape and ecological engineering
Volume: 10
Issue: 1
Start Page: 55
End Page: 64
Publisher DOI: 10.1007/s11355-013-0216-9
Abstract: Although both patch area and shape are key factors driving biodiversity in fragmented terrestrial landscapes, researchers have had limited and mixed success in documenting the effects of these two factors on aquatic ecosystems. Here we examined the effects of lake area and shape on macrophyte species richness in a lowland floodplain by considering the differences in lake types (i.e. marsh, oxbow, man-made lakes). We surveyed species richness of native macrophytes in 35 lakes including 11 marshes, 11 oxbows and 13 man-made lakes with various complex shapes covering from 0.25 to 46.3 ha. Model selection clearly supported the existence of interaction between area and shape effects: large-circular and small-complex lakes supported a higher macrophyte species richness, while it was lower in large-complex and small-circular lakes. Among the three lake types, marsh lakes were more circular and man-made lakes had more complex shapes, while oxbow lakes were intermediate between these two. Also, marsh lakes had positive species-area relationships, while man-made lakes had negative relationships. Our results suggest the opposing shape complexity and species-area relationships of these two contrasting lake types are the result of the interactions between lake area and shape. These results indicate that different lake types result in variations in their conservation value for preserving macrophyte diversity. We suggest that small complex-shaped patches (especially oxbow lakes), which are often given the lowest conservation priority in terrestrial ecosystems, cannot be disregarded when conserving macrophyte biodiversity in aquatic ecosystems.
Rights: The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11355-013-0216-9, © International Consortium of Landscape and Ecological Engineering and Springer Japan 2013
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/57632
Appears in Collections:環境科学院・地球環境科学研究院 (Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 根岸 淳二郎

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