Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research;Volume 13, Number 2

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INFECTION OF SALMONELLA PULLORUM, SALMONELLA NEWINGTON OR SALMONELLA ENTERITIDIS IN LABORATORY RATS BY ORAL INOCULATION

SATO, Gihei

Permalink : http://hdl.handle.net/2115/1805
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Abstract

Albino rats were inoculated orally with different doses of Salmonella pullorum, Salmonella newington, or Salmonella enteritidis. The rats fed a dose of approximately 6×10^8 or more cells of S. pullorum shed the organism transiently in most instances or sometimes intermittently for a few weeks. Agglutinins were detected in inoculated rats in the absence of any clinical and pathological changes. S. pullorum was recovered during the early stage of infection from different organs including spleen and liver of the rats. Rats became infected transiently when they were inoculated with a dose of 6×10^6 of the organism. A part of the rats inoculated with a dose of approximately 5.5×10^8 or 5.5×10^6 cells of S. newington shed the organism continuously or intermittently at least for 5 weeks after inoculation. The organism was localized in the submandibular, and mesenteric nodes, and ceca of the rats in the early stages of infection without resulting in any symptom, pathological change and agglutinin production. In rats fed a dose of 5.5×10^4 organisms, transient excretion of salmonella in feces and occasional infection in the lymph nodes were observed. The rats infected with approximately 5.5×10^8 or 5.5×10^6 cells of S. enteritidis excreted salmonella intermittently or continuously and a part of them did so for at least 5 weeks after inoculation. In this case, systemic infection occurred along with clinical and pathological changes and development of agglutinins. Rats inoculated with 5.5×10^4 or less of S. enteritidis transiently excreted the organism with an occasional infection occurring in their organs. Laboratory rats appear to be somewhat more susceptible to salmonella infection than wild rats.

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