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Volume 19, Number 4 >

STUDY ON THE PIGS INFECTED WITH VIRULENT TESCHEN DISEASE VIRUS (KNM STRAIN) WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://doi.org/10.14943/jjvr.19.4.87

Title: STUDY ON THE PIGS INFECTED WITH VIRULENT TESCHEN DISEASE VIRUS (KNM STRAIN) WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE
Authors: WATANABE, Hiroshi Browse this author
POSPISIL, Zdenek Browse this author
MENSIK, Jarmir Browse this author
Issue Date: Dec-1971
Publisher: The Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine
Journal Title: Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume: 19
Issue: 4
Start Page: 87
End Page: 102
Abstract: Conventional pigs of 4-week-old were infected with KNM strain of virulent Teschen disease virus by intracerebral (IC), intranasal (IN) and contact (CT) routes. The pigs of the IC group showed a very clear relation among clinical signs, virus multiplication and antibody production. Six days after infection (DAI), half the number of group pigs showed sudden neural disorders, the first multiplicated viral antigens were seen in the brain by the fluorescent antibody (FA) technique and the virus was first isolated from the serum sample. Seven DAI, all pigs examined showed the most abundant fluorescence in the central nervous system (CNS). Rapid decrease of fluorescence in the CNS, except for the thalami, occurredon the days following immediately. The pigs of the IN and the CT groups did not show such clear phases of infection. No neural disorders occurred in the CT group in particular. The pigs showed no fluorescence in the spinal cords, though vacuolated neurons were usually seen in the cords as they were also in the other 2 groups. After the middle stage of infection, all pigs showed fluorescence in the capillary endothelial cells of the brain. The most widespread appearance of fluorescence was commonly seen in the cerebellums. A number of Purkinje's cells of the cerebellums disappeared and the neurons in the spinal cords vacuolated in all pigs in the latter stage of infection. At this time, aggregated fluorescent neurons were often seen in the thalami. Appearance of fluorescence was usually less pronounced in the spinal cords. Abundant nonspecific fluorescent cells were found in the mesenteric lymph nodes and in the intestines. The relation between occurrence of fluorescence and of lesions described by some workers was further discussed.
Type: bulletin (article)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/1983
Appears in Collections:Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research > Volume 19, Number 4

Submitter: 獣医学部図書室

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