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Effects of the addition of spleen of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) on the liquefaction and characteristics of fish sauce made from sardine (Sardinella gibbosa)

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Title: Effects of the addition of spleen of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) on the liquefaction and characteristics of fish sauce made from sardine (Sardinella gibbosa)
Other Titles: Effect of Skipjack Tuna Spleen on the Liquefaction and Characteristics of Sardine Fish Sauce
Authors: Klomklao, Sappasith Browse this author
Benjakul, Soottawat Browse this author
Visessanguan, Wonnop Browse this author
Kishimura, Hideki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Simpson, Benjamin K. Browse this author
Keywords: Fish sauce
Spleen
Fermentation
Acceleration
Proteinase
Sardine
Liquefaction
Issue Date: 2006
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd.
Journal Title: Food Chemistry
Volume: 98
Issue: 3
Start Page: 440
End Page: 452
Publisher DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2005.06.013
Abstract: The effects of the addition of spleen of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis), at levels of 0%, 10% and 20%, on the liquefaction and characteristics of fish sauce produced from the sardine (Sardinella gibbosa) with different salt concentrations (15%, 20% and 25%) were monitored during fermentation for 180 days. Fish sauces prepared from sardine with spleen supplementation contained greater total nitrogen, amino nitrogen, formaldehyde nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen than did those without spleen addition throughout the fermentation. The rate of liquefaction was dependent on the amount of spleen added. Reduction of salt content accelerated the hydrolysis of fish protein during fermentation. The liquefaction rate of the lower salt-treated samples was generally faster than were those treated with higher salt content. Among all treatments, sardine with 25% spleen and 15% salt added exhibited the greatest protein hydrolysis, particularly at the early stages, suggesting the combined effects of autolysis and spleen proteinase. The greater liquefaction was coincidental with the development of browning as well as the increase in redness of liquid formed. An acceptability test revealed that the samples were different in colour, aroma, taste and overall acceptance (p < 0.05). Fish sauce samples containing 20% salt, without and with 10% spleen addition had similar acceptabilities to commercial fish sauce. Therefore, the addition of spleen, as well as salt reduction, can accelerate the liquefaction of sardine for fish sauce production.
Relation: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03088146
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/30279
Appears in Collections:水産科学院・水産科学研究院 (Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences / Faculty of Fisheries Sciences) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 岸村 栄毅

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