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Neutral rhizoplane pH of local rice and some predominant tree species in South and Central Kalimantans : a possible strategy of plant adaptation to acidic-soil

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Title: Neutral rhizoplane pH of local rice and some predominant tree species in South and Central Kalimantans : a possible strategy of plant adaptation to acidic-soil
Authors: Hashidoko, Yasuyuki Browse this author
Hasegawa, Toshihiro Browse this author
Purnomo, Erry Browse this author
Tada, Motohiko Browse this author
Limin, Suwido H. Browse this author
Osaki, Mitsuru Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Tahara, Satoshi Browse this author
Keywords: Oryza sativa L.
acid-tolerant local rice
rhizoplane pH
adaptation to acidic soil
Issue Date: 28-Feb-2005
Publisher: 日本熱帯生態学会
Journal Title: Tropics
Volume: 14
Issue: 2
Start Page: 139
End Page: 147
Publisher DOI: 10.3759/tropics.14.139
Abstract: To investigate the acid sulfate soil-adapting strategies of South Kalimantan local rice varieties, their rhizoplane pH was preliminarily examined using a glass-made micro-electrode. Although raw acid-sulfate soils in paddocks in South Kalimantan were generally pH 3.5-4.5 and sometimes pH 2.5, pH values of the rhizoplane of living roots directly measured by the microelectrode always converged to approximately 7.0 (variance 0.02-0.22, n=10). On the other hand, the pH of dead roots, which was measured after soil was thoroughly washed from the surface, was relatively low and often close to the soil pH itself. Similarly constant neutral rhizoplane pH was also observed in the major Central Kalimantan tree species, Cratoxyllum arborescens (upland) and Combretocarpus rotundatus (swampy forests). Whilst, two other predominant grasses, Xyris complanata and Imperata cylindrica, inhabiting acidic soils in upland and lowland, had relatively low rhizoplane pH (6.05 and 5.86, respectively), suggesting that these grasses have different strategies than the paddy rice varieties for adapting to acidic conditions. Rhizoplane bacteria are likely to be one of the factors for the maintenance of neutral rhizoplane pH. In fact, some Sphingomonas sp. raised medium pH, originally set at pH 4.0, to 5.5. These findings suggested the importance of cationic charge in the rhizoplane of local rice varieties for adapting to acid-sulfate soil, which is similar to strategy of some arboreal trees inhabiting acidic peat soil.
Rights: © 2005 日本熱帯生態学会
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/35160
Appears in Collections:農学院・農学研究院 (Graduate School of Agriculture / Faculty of Agriculture) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 橋床 泰之

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