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Variations of Mass Accumulation Rates of Long Chain n-alkanes in the Northern North Pacific During the Last 350 kyrs

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/38520

Title: Variations of Mass Accumulation Rates of Long Chain n-alkanes in the Northern North Pacific During the Last 350 kyrs
Authors: Ratnayake, Nalin P. Browse this author
Suzuki, Noriyuki Browse this author
Sawada, Ken Browse this author
Okada, Makoto Browse this author
Keywords: Long chain n-alkanes
Terrestrial organic matter
Northern North Pacific Ocean
Emperor Seamount
Mass accumulation rates
Issue Date: 2004
Publisher: Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University
Citation: Edited by Shunsuke F. Mawatari, Hisatake Okada.
Journal Title: Neo-Science of Natural History: Integration of Geoscience and Biodiversity Studies : Proceedings of International Symposium on "Dawn of a New Natural History - Integration of Geoscience and Biodiversity Studies" March 5-6, 2004, Sapporo
Start Page: 143
End Page: 146
Abstract: Land plant waxes preserved in the marine sediments are considered to be a useful proxy to reconstruct the terrestrial palaeoenvironments. Long chain n-alkanes were analysed to understand the historical variations of the supply of terrigenous organic matter during the last 350 kyrs. Results show that the mass accumulation rates (MARs) of the long chain n-alkanes tended to increase during glacial stages particularly during the last glacial period in the Emperor Seamount area of the northern North Pacific Ocean. Simultaneous increases in the amount of organic matter attached to eolian dust could have resulted in increased MARs of terrestrial organic matter during glacial stages (marine isotopic stages 2, 4, and 6). In contrast, decrease of aridity along with moderate westerly winds during the interglacial periods resulted in a lower rate of dust production and thus reduced transport of terrestrial organic matter towards the northern North Pacific Ocean.
Description: International Symposium on "Dawn of a New Natural History - Integration of Geoscience and Biodiversity Studies". 5-6 March 2004. Sapporo, Japan.
Conference Name: International Symposium on "Dawn of a New Natural History : Integration of Geoscience and Biodiversity Studies"
Conference Place: Sapporo
Type: proceedings
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/38520
Appears in Collections:Neo-Science of Natural History : Integration of Geoscience and Biodiversity Studies > Proceedings

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