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Impact of free-living amoebae on presence of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae in the hospital environment and its survival in vitro without requirement for amoebae.

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Title: Impact of free-living amoebae on presence of Parachlamydia acanthamoebae in the hospital environment and its survival in vitro without requirement for amoebae.
Authors: Fukumoto, Tatsuya Browse this author
Matsuo, Junji Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Hayashi, Masahiro Browse this author
Oguri, Satoshi Browse this author
Nakamura, Shinji Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Mizutani, Yoshihiko Browse this author
Yao, Takashi Browse this author
Akizawa, Kouzi Browse this author
Suzuki, Haruki Browse this author
Shimizu, Chikara Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Matsuno, Kazuhiko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Issue Date: Sep-2010
Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
Journal Title: Journal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume: 48
Issue: 9
Start Page: 3360
End Page: 3365
Publisher DOI: 10.1128/JCM.00366-10
PMID: 20631104
Abstract: Parachlamydia acanthamoebae is an obligately intracellular bacterium that infects free-living amoebae and is a potential human pathogen in hospital-acquired pneumonia. We examined whether the presence of P. acanthamoebae is related to the presence of Acanthamoeba in an actual hospital environment and assessed the in vitro survival of P. acanthamoebae. Ninety smear samples were collected between November 2007 and March 2008 (trial 1, n 52) and between October 2008 and February 2009 (trial 2, n 38) from the floor (dry conditions, n 56) and sink outlets (moist conditions, n 34) of a hospital. The prevalences of P. acanthamoebae DNA in the first and second trials were 64.3% and 76%, respectively. The prevalences of Acanthamoeba DNA in the first and second trials were 48% and 63.1%, respectively. A statistical correlation between the prevalence of P. acanthamoebae and that of Acanthamoeba was found (trial 1, P 0.011; trial 2, P 0.022), and that correlation increased when samples from just the dry area (floor smear samples, P 0.002) were analyzed but decreased when samples from a moist area were analyzed (P 0.273). The in vitro experiment showed that, without Acanthamoeba, P. acanthamoebae could not survive in dry conditions for 3 days at 30°C or 15 days at 15°C. Thus, both organisms were coincidentally found in an actual hospital environment, with the presence of Acanthamoeba having a significant effect on the long-term survival of P. acanthamoebae, suggesting that this potential human pathogen could spread through a hospital environment via Acanthamoeba.
Rights: © 2010 American Society for Microbiology
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/45468
Appears in Collections:保健科学院・保健科学研究院 (Graduate School of Health Sciences / Faculty of Health Sciences) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 山口 博之

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