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Differences in leafminer (Phyllonorycter, Gracillariidae, Lepidoptera) and aphid (Tuberculatus, Aphididae, Hemiptera) composition among Quercus dentata, Q. crispula, Q. serrata, and their hybrids

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Title: Differences in leafminer (Phyllonorycter, Gracillariidae, Lepidoptera) and aphid (Tuberculatus, Aphididae, Hemiptera) composition among Quercus dentata, Q. crispula, Q. serrata, and their hybrids
Authors: Hata, Yoshihiro Browse this author
Hashiba, Takuto Browse this author
Nakamura, Takashi Browse this author
Kitamura, Masashi Browse this author
Ishida, Takahide A. Browse this author
Akimoto, Shin-ichi Browse this author
Sato, Hiroaki Browse this author
Kimura, Masahito T. Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Host specificity
Hybridization
Leaf morphology
Oak
Issue Date: Aug-2011
Publisher: Springer Japan
Journal Title: Journal of Forest Research
Volume: 16
Issue: 4
Start Page: 309
End Page: 318
Publisher DOI: 10.1007/s10310-010-0230-9
Abstract: Leafminer (Phyllonorycter, Gracillariidae, Lepidoptera) and aphid (Tuberculatus, Aphididae, Hemiptera) compositions were studied in three deciduous oak species, Quercus dentata, Q. crispula, and Q. serrata, and their hybrids in Tomakomai Experimental Forest of Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, northern Japan. Identification of trees in this forest was done mainly on the basis of discriminant analysis on leaf morphology with reference to trees in pure Q. dentata and Q. crispula stands and a Q. serrata stand mixed with Q. crispula. The results suggested that hybridization occurred in all combinations (i.e. Q. dentata-Q. crispula, Q. crispula-Q. serrata, and Q. serrata-Q. dentata) and the frequency of hybrids was about 10%. The composition of Phyllonorycter and Tuberculatus species differed between Q. dentata and Q. crispula or Q. serrata, but did not differ between Q. crispula and Q. serrata. Thus, Q. dentata would differ from Q. crispula and Q. serrata in chemical properties that determine herbivore host selection, survival and performance, possibly reflecting their eco-physiological differences or phylogenetic distances. The study insects were divided into three groups; species specialized to Q. dentata (three Phyllonorycter and one Tuberculatus species), those to Q. crispula and Q. serrata (six Phyllonorycter and two Tuberculatus species), and a species collected at least from Q. dentata and Q. crispula (one Tuberculatus species). Putative hybrid trees of Q. dentata and Q. crispula harbored both Q. dentata- and Q. crispula-specific insects.
Rights: The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/47206
Appears in Collections:環境科学院・地球環境科学研究院 (Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 木村 正人

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