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Efficacy of forming biofilms by naphthalene degrading Pseudomonas stutzeri T102 toward bioremediation technology and its molecular mechanisms

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Title: Efficacy of forming biofilms by naphthalene degrading Pseudomonas stutzeri T102 toward bioremediation technology and its molecular mechanisms
Authors: Shimada, Kohei Browse this author
Itoh, Yoshikane Browse this author
Washio, Kenji Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Morikawa, Masaaki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Bioremediation
Naphthalene degradation
Biofilms
Pseudomonas
Issue Date: Apr-2012
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal Title: Chemosphere
Volume: 87
Issue: 3
Start Page: 226
End Page: 233
Publisher DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.12.078
PMID: 22285037
Abstract: In natural environments, bacteria often exist in close association with surfaces and interfaces. There they form "biofilms", multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix. The biofilms confer on the constituent cells high resistance to environmental stresses and diverse microenvironments that help generate cellular heterogeneity. Here we report on the ability of Pseudomonas stutzeri T102 biofilm-associated cells, as compared with that of planktonic cells, to degrade naphthalene and survive in petroleum-contaminated soils. In liquid culture system. T102 biofilm-associated cells did not degrade naphthalene during initial hours of incubation but then degraded it faster than planktonic cells, which degraded naphthalene at a nearly constant rate. This delayed but high degradation activity of the biofilms could be attributed to super-activated cells that were detached from the biofilms. When the fitness of T102 biofilm-associated cells was tested in natural petroleum-contaminated soils, they were capable of surviving for 10 wk; by then T102 planktonic cells were mostly extinct. Naphthalene degradation activity in the soils that had been inoculated with T102 biofilms was indeed higher than that observed in soils inoculated with T102 planktonic cells. These results suggest that inoculation of contaminated soils with P. stutzeri T102 biofilms should enable bioaugmentation to be a more durable and effective bioremediation technology than inoculation with planktonic cells.
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/49094
Appears in Collections:環境科学院・地球環境科学研究院 (Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 森川 正章

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