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Metal and metalloid levels and bio-accumulation characteristics in soil, sediment, land plants and hippopotami (Hippopotamus amphibius L) from the South Luangwa National Park, Zambia

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Title: Metal and metalloid levels and bio-accumulation characteristics in soil, sediment, land plants and hippopotami (Hippopotamus amphibius L) from the South Luangwa National Park, Zambia
Authors: Nakayama, Shouta M. M. Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Ikenaka, Yoshinori Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Muzandu, Kaampwe Browse this author
Choongo, Kennedy Browse this author
M'kandawire, Ethel Browse this author
Yasuda, Jun Browse this author
Ishizuka, Mayumi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Bio-accumulation
Hippopotamus
Metal
Plant
Sediment
Soil
Issue Date: 1-Jun-2012
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal Title: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
Volume: 80
Start Page: 333
End Page: 338
Publisher DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2012.04.003
PMID: 22521811
Abstract: Hippopotami (Hippopotamus amphibius L) are large semi-aquatic mammals that can be exposed to metals and metalloid from both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Therefore, knowledge of metal and metalloid accumulation characteristics in hippopotami living in the national park is important from ecotoxicological point of view. Levels of toxic metals (Cd, Pb and Hg) and metalloid (As) in hippopotami liver from the South Luangwa National Park in Zambia were far lower compared to the established values of toxic levels in cattle. No temporal variations of metal levels in hippopotami were observed, probably because of good management condition and the lack of anthropogenic activities around the national park. However, hippopotami liver accumulated significantly higher concentrations of Hg compared to soil, sediment and their food (plants), most likely due to a process of biomagnifications throughout a trophic chain. Moreover, hippopotami liver and land plants showed significantly higher Cd levels than those of soil. These results strongly suggest that hippopotami liver accumulate higher levels of these metals if surrounding environment is contaminated. Levels of Cr and Ni in hippopotami liver were higher compared to other toxic metals. Since this is the first report to show the Cr and Ni levels and bio-accumulation characteristics of Hg and Cd in hippopotami, we concluded that continuous monitoring and evaluation of toxic effects of these metals on hippopotami should be conducted.
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/49400
Appears in Collections:獣医学院・獣医学研究院 (Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine / Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 石塚 真由美

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