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Female-biased sex allocation in wild populations of the eriosomatine aphid Prociphilus oriens: local mate competition or transgenerational effects of maternal investment?

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Title: Female-biased sex allocation in wild populations of the eriosomatine aphid Prociphilus oriens: local mate competition or transgenerational effects of maternal investment?
Authors: Akimoto, Shin-ichi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Mitsuhashi, Ryota Browse this author
Yoshino, Tomoko Browse this author
Keywords: Eriosomatinae
Parental investment
Parthenogenesis
Patch
Polymorphism
Sex ratio
Issue Date: Jul-2012
Publisher: Springer Japan
Journal Title: Population Ecology
Volume: 54
Issue: 3
Start Page: 411
End Page: 419
Publisher DOI: 10.1007/s10144-012-0312-y
Abstract: Several aphid species exhibit female-biased sex allocation. Local mate competition (LMC) has been postulated to be the evolutionary factor of the female-biased sex allocation. We estimated individual sex allocation in the eriosomatine aphid Prociphilus oriens and explained the observed pattern of sex allocation based on a hypothesis other than LMC. On the basis of the relationship between maternal body size and brood size, we estimated the cost of producing a female to be 1.85 times the cost of producing a male. The population-wide allocation to males was 22%-24 %. Winged mothers exhibited a large variation in the number of male and female embryos they had, including 23%-30 % of winged mothers producing only female embryos. There was polymorphism in the sex-ratio expression. Thus, the constant male hypothesis assuming LMC was not supported. Winged mothers that produced an all-female brood contained larger female embryos than did mothers that produced a bisexual brood. Previous studies have indicated that a large sexual female produces a single large egg, which hatches into a first-instar larva containing a larger amount of gonads. Thus, in eriosomatine aphids, maternal investment in daughters directly affects the potential fecundity of granddaughters, whereas investment in sons does not. We propose a hypothesis that higher fitness returns from maternal investment in daughters than in sons may have primarily led to the evolution of highly female-biased sex allocation in P. oriens.
Rights: The final publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/49600
Appears in Collections:農学院・農学研究院 (Graduate School of Agriculture / Faculty of Agriculture) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 秋元 信一

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