HUSCAP logo Hokkaido Univ. logo

Hokkaido University Collection of Scholarly and Academic Papers >
Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine / Faculty of Veterinary Medicine >
Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc >

Borrelia miyamotoi Infections among Wild Rodents Show Age and Month Independence and Correlation with Ixodes persulcatus Larval Attachment in Hokkaido, Japan

Files in This Item:
VZD13-2_92-97.pdf231.42 kBPDFView/Open
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/52180

Title: Borrelia miyamotoi Infections among Wild Rodents Show Age and Month Independence and Correlation with Ixodes persulcatus Larval Attachment in Hokkaido, Japan
Authors: Taylor, Kyle R. Browse this author
Takano, Ai Browse this author
Konnai, Satoru Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Shimozuru, Michito Browse this author
Kawabata, Hiroki Browse this author
Tsubota, Toshio Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Borrelia
vectors
Lyme disease
ticks
Ixodes persulcatus
relapsing fever
Issue Date: Feb-2013
Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert
Journal Title: Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
Volume: 13
Issue: 2
Start Page: 92
End Page: 97
Publisher DOI: 10.1089/vbz.2012.1027
PMID: 23210636
Abstract: To clarify how Borrelia miyamotoi is maintained in the environment in Hokkaido, we examined Ixodes persulcatus for its prevalence among wild rodents and its tick vector by detecting a portion of the borrelial flaB gene in rodent urinary bladder and blood samples, and from whole ticks. We compared B. miyamotoi infection rates to Borrelia garinii and Borrelia afzelii, which are human Lyme disease pathogens also carried by wild rodents, and which are transmitted by the same vector tick. Whereas B. garinii and B. afzelii showed age dependence of infection rates among wild rodents (18.4% and 9.9% among adults and 6.0% and 3.4% among sub-adults, respectively) when looking at urinary bladder samples, B. miyamotoi infection rates were not age dependent for either blood (4.2% among adults, and 7.9% among sub-adults) or urinary bladder samples (1.0% among adults, and 1.7% among sub-adults). Moreover, while B. garinii and B. afzelii infection rates showed increases across months (June, July [p < 0.05] and August [p < 0.01] had higher rates than in May for adult rodents with B. garinii, and July and August had higher rates than in May [p < 0.01] for adult rodents with B. afzelii), B. miyamotoi infection rates did not show significant month dependence. These differences in month and age dependence led us to suspect that B. miyamotoi may not develop persistent infections in wild rodents, as B. garinii and B. afzelii are thought to. Furthermore, we examined the extent of rodent exposure to I. persulcatus nymphs and larvae throughout most of the tick's active season (May through September), and determined that B. miyamotoi infection rates in sub-adult rodents were correlated with larval burden (p < 0.01), suggesting that larvae may be very important in transmission of B. miyamotoi to wild rodents.
Rights: This is a copy of an article published in the Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases © 2013 copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases is available online at: http://online.liebertpub.com.
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/52180
Appears in Collections:獣医学院・獣医学研究院 (Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine / Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 坪田 敏男

Export metadata:

OAI-PMH ( junii2 , jpcoar )

MathJax is now OFF:


 

Feedback - Hokkaido University