HUSCAP logo Hokkaido Univ. logo

Hokkaido University Collection of Scholarly and Academic Papers >
Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science >
Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc >

Early phase of the invasion of Balanus glandula along the coast of Eastern Hokkaido: changes in abundance, distribution, and recruitment

This item is licensed under: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

Files in This Item:
art_10.1007_s10530-013-0619-4.pdf377.38 kBPDFView/Open
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/56411

Title: Early phase of the invasion of Balanus glandula along the coast of Eastern Hokkaido: changes in abundance, distribution, and recruitment
Authors: Rashidul Alam, A. K. M. Browse this author
Hagino, Tomoaki Browse this author
Fukaya, Keiichi Browse this author
Okuda, Takehiro Browse this author
Nakaoka, Masahiro Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Noda, Takashi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Barnacle
Invasion dynamics
Marine sessile
Pacific coast
Range expansion
Rocky intertidal
Issue Date: Aug-2014
Publisher: Springer
Journal Title: Biological Invasions
Volume: 16
Issue: 8
Start Page: 1699
End Page: 1708
Publisher DOI: 10.1007/s10530-013-0619-4
Abstract: To understand the patterns and processes associated with the population dynamics of Balanus glandula during the early phase of invasion along the Pacific coast of eastern Hokkaido, population surveys were conducted from 2002 to 2011 at five shores, each consisting of five paired plots (scraped recruitment plot and unscraped establishment plot), along 49 km of coastline located 144 km east of the eastern front of the invasion of this species in 2000. Larval recruitment was first detected in 2004, but the establishment of a population was not observed until 2 years later at the westernmost shore of the study area. Occurrence increased from non-native barnacle present in 4 % of plots in 2006 to 100 % in 2011, but mean coverage remained low (<5 %) in 2011. Most local population coverage fluctuated without indicating clear temporal trends, but coverage in one plot showed a consistent pattern of rapid increase. Local extinctions occurred, but rates of local extinction decreased with time as larval recruitment increased. Lag times between recruitment and establishment occurred for 64 % of the paired plots and ranged from 1 to 4 years. Lag times decreased after 5 years, when larval recruitment increased. These findings suggest that the intensity of larval recruitment determined invasion dynamics during this early phase of the invasion, and the monitoring of recruitment is therefore essential for early detection of invasions by sessile marine organisms and prediction of their range expansion.
Rights: © The Author(s) 2013. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/56411
Appears in Collections:環境科学院・地球環境科学研究院 (Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: A.K.M. Rashidul Alam

Export metadata:

OAI-PMH ( junii2 , jpcoar )

MathJax is now OFF:


 

 - Hokkaido University