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The genetic population structure of lacustrine sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka, in Japan as the endangered species

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Title: The genetic population structure of lacustrine sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka, in Japan as the endangered species
Authors: Kogura, Yuichiro Browse this author
Seeb, James E. Browse this author
Azuma, Noriko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Kudo, Hideaki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Abe, Syuiti Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Kaeriyama, Masahide Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Lacustrine sockeye salmon
Oncorhynchus nerka
Population structure
Single nucleotide polymorphisms
Mitochondrial DNA
Bottleneck effect
Issue Date: Dec-2011
Publisher: Springer
Journal Title: Environmental Biology of Fishes
Volume: 92
Issue: 4
Start Page: 539
End Page: 550
Publisher DOI: 10.1007/s10641-011-9876-1
Abstract: Lacustrine sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) are listed as an endangered species in Japan despite little genetic information on their population structure. In order to clarify the genetic diversity and structure of Japanese populations for evaluating on the bottleneck effect and an endangered species, we analyzed the ND5 region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and 45 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 640 lacustrine sockeye salmon in Japan and 80 anadromous sockeye salmon in Iliamna Lake of Alaska. The genetic diversity of the Japanese population in both mtDNA and SNPs was significantly less than that of the Iliamna Lake population. Moreover, all Japanese populations had SNP loci deviating from the HWE. In spite of low genetic diversity, the SNP analyses resulted that the Japanese population was significantly divided into three groups. These suggest that Japanese sockeye salmon populations should be protected as an endangered species and genetically disturbed by the hatchery program and transplantations.
Rights: The final publication is available at link.springer.com
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/56578
Appears in Collections:水産科学院・水産科学研究院 (Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences / Faculty of Fisheries Sciences) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 帰山 雅秀

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