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Larval dispersal dampens population fluctuation and shapes the interspecific spatial distribution patterns of rocky intertidal gastropods

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/62537

Title: Larval dispersal dampens population fluctuation and shapes the interspecific spatial distribution patterns of rocky intertidal gastropods
Authors: Sahara, Ryosuke Browse this author
Fukaya, Keiichi Browse this author
Okuda, Takehiro Browse this author
Hori, Masakazu Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Yamamoto, Tomoko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Nakaoka, Masahiro Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Noda, Takashi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Issue Date: 2015
Journal Title: Ecography
Volume: 38
Start Page: 1
End Page: 9
Publisher DOI: 10.1111/ecog.01354
Abstract: Many marine benthic invertebrates pass through a planktonic larval stage whereas others spend their entire lifetimes in benthic habitats. Recent studies indicate that non-planktonic species show relatively greater fine-scale patchiness than do planktonic species, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. One hypothesis for such a difference is that larval dispersal enhances the connectivity of populations and buffers population fluctuations and reduces local extinction risk, consequently increasing patch occupancy rate and decreasing spatial patchiness. If this mechanism does indeed play a significant role, then the distribution of non-planktonic species should be more aggregated—both temporally and spatially—than the distribution of species with a planktonic larval stage. To test this prediction, we compared (1) both the spatial and the temporal abundance–occupancy relationships and (2) both the spatial and the temporal mean–variance relationships of population size across species of rocky intertidal gastropods with differing dispersive traits from the Pacific coast of Japan. We found that, compared to planktonic species, non-planktonic species exhibited (1) a smaller occupancy rate for any given level of mean population size and (2) greater variations in population size, both spatially and temporally. This suggests that the macroecological patterns observed in this study (i.e., the abundance–occupancy relationships and mean–variance relationships of population size across species) were shaped by the effect of larval dispersal dampening population fluctuation, which works over both space and time. While it has been widely assumed that larval dispersal enhances population fluctuations, larval dispersal may in fact enhance the connectively of populations and buffer population fluctuations and reduce local extinction risks.
Rights: The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/62537
Appears in Collections:環境科学院・地球環境科学研究院 (Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 野田 隆史

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