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Light compensation points in shade-grown seedlings of deciduous broadleaf tree species with different successional traits raised under elevated CO2

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Title: Light compensation points in shade-grown seedlings of deciduous broadleaf tree species with different successional traits raised under elevated CO2
Authors: Kitao, M. Browse this author
Hida, T. Browse this author
Eguchi, N. Browse this author
Tobita, H. Browse this author
Utsugi, H. Browse this author
Uemura, A. Browse this author
Kitaoka, S. Browse this author
Koike, T. Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Apparent quantum yield
CO2 enrichment
dark respiration
photosynthesis
shade tolerance
Issue Date: Jan-2016
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Journal Title: Plant Biology
Volume: 18
Start Page: 22
End Page: 27
Publisher DOI: 10.1111/plb.12400
PMID: 26404633
Abstract: We measured leaf photosynthetic traits in shade-grown seedlings of four tree species native to northern Japan, raised under an elevated CO2 condition, to investigate the effects of elevated CO2 on shade tolerance of deciduous broadleaf tree species with different successional traits. We considered Betula platyphylla var. japonica and Betula maximowicziana as pioneer species, Quercus mongolica var. crispula as a mid-successional species, and Acer mono as a climax species. The plants were grown under shade conditions (10% of full sunlight) in a CO2-regulated phytotron. Light compensation points (LCPs) decreased in all tree species when grown under elevated CO2 (720 μmol·mol−1), which were accompanied by higher apparent quantum yields but no photosynthetic down-regulation. LCPs in Q. mongolica and A. mono grown under elevated CO2 were lower than those in the two pioneer birch species. The LCP in Q. mongolica seedlings was not different from that of A. mono in each CO2 treatment. However, lower dark respiration rates were observed in A. mono than in Q. mongolica, suggesting higher shade tolerance in A. mono as a climax species in relation to carbon loss at night. Thus, elevated CO2 may have enhanced shade tolerance by lowering LCPs in all species, but the ranking of shade tolerance related to successional traits did not change among species under elevated CO2, i.e. the highest shade tolerance was observed in the climax species (A. mono), followed by a gap-dependent species (Q. mongolica), while lower shade tolerance was observed in the pioneer species (B. platyphylla and B. maximowicziana).
Rights: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article:Plant Biology, Volume 18(S1),pages 22–27,January 2016,which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/plb.12400/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/63956
Appears in Collections:農学院・農学研究院 (Graduate School of Agriculture / Faculty of Agriculture) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 小池 孝良

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