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The Association of Prenatal Exposure to Perfluorinated Chemicals with Maternal Essential and Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids during Pregnancy and the Birth Weight of Their Offspring : The Hokkaido Study

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/64063

Title: The Association of Prenatal Exposure to Perfluorinated Chemicals with Maternal Essential and Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids during Pregnancy and the Birth Weight of Their Offspring : The Hokkaido Study
Authors: Kishi, Reiko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Nakajima, Tamie Browse this author
Goudarzi, Houman Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Kobayashi, Sachiko Browse this author
Sasaki, Seiko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Okada, Emiko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Miyashita, Chihiro Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Itoh, Sachiko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Araki, Atsuko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Ikeno, Tamiko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Iwasaki, Yusuke Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Nakazawa, Hiroyuki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Issue Date: Oct-2015
Publisher: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Journal Title: Environmental Health Perspectives
Volume: 123
Issue: 10
Start Page: 1038
End Page: 1045
Publisher DOI: 10.1289/ehp.1408834
Abstract: Background: Fatty acids (FAs) are essential for fetal growth. Exposure to perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) may disrupt FA homeostasis, but there are no epidemiological data regarding associations of PFCs and FA concentrations. Objectives: We estimated associations between perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)/perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) concentrations and maternal levels of FAs and triglyceride (TG) and birth size of the offspring. Methods: We analyzed 306 mother-child pairs in this birth cohort between 2002 and 2005 in Japan. The prenatal PFOS and PFOA levels were measured in maternal serum samples by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Maternal blood levels of nine FAs and TG were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and TG E-Test Wako kits, respectively. Information on infants' birth size was obtained from participant medical records. Results: The median PFOS and PFOA levels were 5.6 and 1.4 ng/mL, respectively. In the fully adjusted model, including maternal age, parity, annual household income, blood sampling period, alcohol consumption, and smoking during pregnancy, PFOS but not PFOA had a negative association with the levels of palmitic, palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic, α-linolenic, and arachidonic acids (p < 0.005) and TG (p- value = 0.016). Female infants weighed 186.6 g less with mothers whose PFOS levels were in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile (95% CI: -363.4, -9.8). We observed no significant association between maternal levels of PFOS and birth weight of male infants. Conclusions: Our data suggest an inverse association between PFOS exposure and polyunsaturated FA levels in pregnant women. We also found a negative association between maternal PFOS levels and female birth weight.
Rights: Reproduced from Environmental Health Perspectives
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/64063
Appears in Collections:環境健康科学研究教育センター (Center for Environmental and Health Sciences) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 荒木 敦子

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