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The phenotype of infiltrating macrophages influences arteriosclerotic plaque vulnerability in the carotid artery

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Title: The phenotype of infiltrating macrophages influences arteriosclerotic plaque vulnerability in the carotid artery
Authors: Cho, Kyu Yong Browse this author
Miyoshi, Hideaki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Kuroda, Satoshi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Yasuda, Hiroshi Browse this author
Kamiyama, Kenji Browse this author
Nakagawara, Joji Browse this author
Takigami, Masayoshi Browse this author
Kondo, Takuma Browse this author
Atsumi, Tatsuya Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Atherosclerosis
carotid artery disease
inflammation
macrophage
stroke
Issue Date: Oct-2013
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal Title: Journal of stroke and cerebrovascular diseases
Volume: 22
Issue: 7
Start Page: 910
End Page: 918
Publisher DOI: 10.1016/j.jstrokecerebrovasdis.2012.11.020
PMID: 23273713
Abstract: Background: Proinflammatory (M1) macrophages and anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages have been identified in atherosclerotic plaques. While these macrophages have been speculated to be related to plaque vulnerability, there are limited studies investigating this relationship. Therefore, we examined the association between macrophage phenotype (M1 versus M2) and plaque vulnerability and clinical events. Methods: Patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy received an ultrasound of the carotid artery before surgery. Plaques were processed for analysis by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction studies. Medical history and clinical data were obtained from medical records. Results: Patients were divided into 2 groups: those suffering from acute ischemic attack (symptomatic, n = 31) and those that did not present with symptoms (asymptomatic, n = 34). Ultrasound analysis revealed that plaque vulnerability was greater in the symptomatic group (P= .033; Chi-square test). Immunohistochemistry revealed that plaques from the symptomatic group had a greater concentration of M1 macrophages (CD68-, CD11c-positive) while plaques from the asymptomatic group had more M2 macrophages (CD163-positive). This observation was confirmed by Western blotting. Characterization by real-time polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that plaques from the symptomatic group had increased expression of the M1 markers CD68 and CD11c, as well as monocyte chemoattractive protein-1, interleukin-6, and matrix metalloproteinase-9. In addition, more M1 macrophages expressed in unstable plaques were defined by ultrasound analysis, while more M2 macrophages were expressed in stable plaques. Conclusions: Our data show that M1 macrophage content of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with clinical incidence of ischemic stroke and increased inflammation or fibrinolysis. We also show the benefits of using ultrasound to evaluate vulnerability in the plaques.
Rights: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/67265
Appears in Collections:北海道大学病院 (Hokkaido University Hospital) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 三好 秀明

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