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Predictive and tempo-flexible synchronization to a visual metronome in monkeys

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/67310

Title: Predictive and tempo-flexible synchronization to a visual metronome in monkeys
Authors: Takeya, Ryuji Browse this author
Kameda, Masashi Browse this author
Patel, Aniruddh D. Browse this author
Tanaka, Masaki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Issue Date: 21-Jul-2017
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Journal Title: Scientific reports
Volume: 7
Start Page: 6127
Publisher DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-06417-3
Abstract: Predictive and tempo-flexible synchronization to an auditory beat is a fundamental component of human music. To date, only certain vocal learning species show this behaviour spontaneously. Prior research training macaques (vocal non-learners) to tap to an auditory or visual metronome found their movements to be largely reactive, not predictive. Does this reflect the lack of capacity for predictive synchronization in monkeys, or lack of motivation to exhibit this behaviour? To discriminate these possibilities, we trained monkeys to make synchronized eye movements to a visual metronome. We found that monkeys could generate predictive saccades synchronized to periodic visual stimuli when an immediate reward was given for every predictive movement. This behaviour generalized to novel tempi, and the monkeys could maintain the tempo internally. Furthermore, monkeys could flexibly switch from predictive to reactive saccades when a reward was given for each reactive response. In contrast, when humans were asked to make a sequence of reactive saccades to a visual metronome, they often unintentionally generated predictive movements. These results suggest that even vocal non-learners may have the capacity for predictive and tempo-flexible synchronization to a beat, but that only certain vocal learning species are intrinsically motivated to do it.
Rights: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/67310
Appears in Collections:医学院・医学研究院 (Graduate School of Medicine / Faculty of Medicine) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 竹谷 隆司

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