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Quadriceps force and anterior tibial force occur obviously later than vertical ground reaction force: a simulation study

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Title: Quadriceps force and anterior tibial force occur obviously later than vertical ground reaction force: a simulation study
Authors: Ueno, Ryo Browse this author
Ishida, Tomoya Browse this author
Yamanaka, Masanori Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Taniguchi, Shohei Browse this author
Ikuta, Ryohei Browse this author
Samukawa, Mina Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Saito, Hiroshi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Tohyama, Harukazu Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Anterior cruciate ligament
Biomechanics
Musculoskeletal model
Quadriceps
Issue Date: 18-Nov-2017
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal Title: BMC musculoskeletal disorders
Volume: 18
Start Page: 467
Publisher DOI: 10.1186/s12891-017-1832-6
Abstract: Background: Although it is well known that quadriceps force generates anterior tibial force, it has been unclear whether quadriceps force causes great anterior tibial force during the early phase of a landing task. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the quadriceps force induced great anterior tibial force during the early phase of a landing task. Methods: Fourteen young, healthy, female subjects performed a single-leg landing task. Muscle force and anterior tibial force were estimated from motion capture data and synchronized force data from the force plate. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance and the post hoc Bonferroni test were conducted to compare the peak time of the vertical ground reaction force, quadriceps force and anterior tibial force during the single-leg landing. In addition, we examined the contribution of vertical and posterior ground reaction force, knee flexion angle and moment to peak quadriceps force using multiple linear regression. Results: The peak times of the estimated quadriceps force (96.0 +/- 23.0 ms) and anterior tibial force (111.9 +/- 18.9 ms) were significantly later than that of the vertical ground reaction force (63.5 +/- 6.8 ms) during the single-leg landing. The peak quadriceps force was positively correlated with the peak anterior tibial force (R = 0.953, P < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the peak knee flexion moment contributed significantly to the peak quadriceps force (R-2 = 0.778, P < 0.001). Conclusion: The peak times of the quadriceps force and the anterior tibial force were obviously later than that of the vertical ground reaction force for the female athletes during successful single-leg landings. Studies have reported that the peak time of the vertical ground reaction force was close to the time of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) disruption in ACL injury cases. It is possible that early contraction of the quadriceps during landing might induce ACL disruption as a result of excessive anterior tibial force in unanticipated situations in ACL injury cases.
Rights: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/68016
Appears in Collections:保健科学院・保健科学研究院 (Graduate School of Health Sciences / Faculty of Health Sciences) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

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