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Direct measurements of DMS flux from Antarctic fast sea ice to the atmosphere by a chamber technique

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Title: Direct measurements of DMS flux from Antarctic fast sea ice to the atmosphere by a chamber technique
Authors: Nomura, Daiki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Koga, Seizi Browse this author
Kasamatsu, Nobue Browse this author
Shinagawa, Hideo Browse this author
Simizu, Daisuke Browse this author
Wada, Makoto Browse this author
Fukuchi, Mitsuo Browse this author
Keywords: DMS
Southern Ocean
chamber method
flux
sea ice
slush layer
Issue Date: 7-Apr-2012
Publisher: Wiley
Journal Title: Journal of Geophysical Research : Oceans
Volume: 117
Issue: C4
Publisher DOI: 10.1029/2010JC006755
Abstract: We present the first direct measurements of dimethylsulfide (DMS) emissions from Antarctic sea ice to the atmosphere during the seasonal warming period obtained using a chamber technique. Estimated DMS fluxes measured over the snow and superimposed ice (ice formed by the freezing of snow meltwater) were from 0.1 to 0.3 μmol m−2 d−1. The DMS fluxes measured directly over the sea‐ice slush layer after removal of the snow and superimposed ice, ranged from 0.1 to 5.3 μmol m−2 d−1, were large compared to those measured over the snow and superimposed ice. The DMS concentrations in slush water ranged from 1.0 to 103.7 nM. The DMS fluxes increased with increasing DMS concentrations in slush water. Our results indicate that the potential DMS flux measured over the slush layer occurred originally from the slush layer, and was dependent on the DMS concentrations in slush water. However, snow accumulation and the formation of superimposed ice over the slush layer significantly blocks the diffusion of DMS to the atmosphere, with the result that DMS tends to accumulate in the slush layer although the removal process of DMS by photolysis reaction can modify the DMS flux from the slush layer. Hence, the slush layer has the potential to release the DMS to the atmosphere and ocean when the snow and superimposed ice melts.
Rights: © 2012 American Geophysical Union
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/70582
Appears in Collections:水産科学院・水産科学研究院 (Graduate School of Fisheries Sciences / Faculty of Fisheries Sciences) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 野村 大樹

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