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Prevalence and risk factors of testicular microlithiasis in patients with hypospadias : a retrospective study

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Title: Prevalence and risk factors of testicular microlithiasis in patients with hypospadias : a retrospective study
Authors: Nakamura, Michiko Browse this author
Moriya, Kimihiko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Nishimura, Yoko Browse this author
Nishida, Mutsumi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Kudo, Yusuke Browse this author
Kanno, Yukiko Browse this author
Kitta, Takeya Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Kon, Masafumi Browse this author
Shinohara, Nobuo Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Testicular microlithiasis
Hypospadias
Undescended testis
Ultrasonography
Issue Date: 29-May-2018
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal Title: BMC pediatrics
Volume: 18
Start Page: 179
Publisher DOI: 10.1186/s12887-018-1151-6
Abstract: Background: It has been described that the incidence of testicular microlithiasis is high in several congenital disorders which may be associated with testicular impairment and infertility. Several reports have shown that a prepubertal or pubertal hormonal abnormality in the pituitary-gonadal axis was identified in some patients with hypospadias that is one of the most common disorders of sex development. However, exact prevalence or risk factors of testicular microlithiasis in patients with hypospadias have not reported so far. In the present study, to clarify the prevalence and risk factors of testicular microlithiasis in patients with hypospadias, a retrospective chart review was performed. Methods: Children with hypospadias who underwent testicular ultrasonography between January 2010 and April 2016 were enrolled in the present study. Severity of hypospadias was divided into mild and severe. The prevalence and risk factors of testicular microlithiasis or classic testicular microlithiasis were examined. Results: Of 121 children, mild and severe hypospadias were identified in 66 and 55, respectively. Sixteen children had undescended testis. Median age at ultrasonography evaluation was 1.7 years old. Testicular microlithiasis and classic testicular microlithiasis were documented in 17 children (14.0%) and 8 (6.6%), respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that presence of undescended testis was only a significant factor for testicular microlithiasis and classic testicular microlithiasis. The prevalence of testicular microlithiasis or classic testicular microlithiasis was significantly higher in children with undescended testis compared to those without undescended testis (testicular microlithiasis; 43.8% versus 9.5% (p = 0.002), classic testicular microlithiasis; 37.5% versus 1.9% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The current study demonstrated that the presence of undescended testis was only a significant risk factor for testicular microlithiasis or classic testicular microlithiasis in patients with hypospadias. As co-existing undescended testis has been reported as a risk factor for testicular dysfunction among patients with hypospadias, the current findings suggest that testicular microlithiasis in children with hypospadias may be associated with impaired testicular function. Conversely, patients with isolated HS seem to have lower risks for testicular impairment. Further investigation with longer follow-up will be needed to clarify these findings.
Rights: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/71198
Appears in Collections:医学院・医学研究院 (Graduate School of Medicine / Faculty of Medicine) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 守屋 仁彦

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