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Altered morphologies and physiological compensation in a rapidly expanding dwarf bamboo in alpine ecosystems

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/71494

Title: Altered morphologies and physiological compensation in a rapidly expanding dwarf bamboo in alpine ecosystems
Authors: Kudo, Gaku Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Aoshima, Yuta Browse this author
Miyata, Rie Browse this author
Winkler, Daniel E. Browse this author
Keywords: Altitude
biomass allocation
carbon fixation
range expansion
Sasa kurilensis
Issue Date: 20-Jun-2018
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Journal Title: Arctic antarctic and alpine research
Volume: 50
Issue: 1
Start Page: UNSP e1463733
Publisher DOI: 10.1080/15230430.2018.1463733
Abstract: Dwarf bamboos are evergreen woody grasses that produce large clonal patches and dominate the understories of the montane to subalpine zones of northern Japan. Recently, dwarf bamboos have expanded their distribution to above the treeline and into alpine meadows. To clarify the mechanism of rapid invasion into the alpine, we compared the morphological performance, biomass allocation, photosynthetic activity, CO2 fixation ability, and sensitivity to temperature of dwarf bamboos in their native montane and expanding alpine sites in the Taisetsu Mountains. Alpine bamboo produced shorter but denser aboveground structures, where leaves were smaller and branching was more frequent. The total biomass of alpine bamboo was nearly half of that produced by montane bamboo. Montane bamboo produced more stems, while alpine bamboo invested more carbon in belowground structures. CO2 fixation per land area by alpine bamboo was 1.3 times higher than rates observed in montane bamboo. Optimal temperatures for photosynthesis were lower in alpine bamboo (15-20 degrees C) than in montane bamboo (20-25 degrees C), probably because of the rapid decrease in stomatal conductance at higher temperatures (>20 degrees C) observed in the alpine site. Overall, leaf transpiration rates were higher in alpine bamboo, but water-use efficiency was similar between sites. A high flexibility in both morphological and physiological characteristics enabled dwarf bamboos to expand into alpine environments in response to recent climate change.
Rights: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/71494
Appears in Collections:環境科学院・地球環境科学研究院 (Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 工藤 岳

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