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A linkage between flowering phenology and fruit-set success of alpine plant communities with reference to the seasonality and pollination effectiveness of bees and flies

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/71818

Title: A linkage between flowering phenology and fruit-set success of alpine plant communities with reference to the seasonality and pollination effectiveness of bees and flies
Authors: Mizunaga, Yuki Browse this author
Kudo, Gaku Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Alpine ecosystem
Bumble bee
Diptera
Flower production
Pollinator
Issue Date: Nov-2017
Publisher: Springer
Journal Title: Oecologia
Volume: 185
Issue: 3
Start Page: 453
End Page: 464
Publisher DOI: 10.1007/s00442-017-3946-9
PMID: 28889327
Abstract: To clarify the linkage between flowering phenology and pollination success in alpine plant communities, we quantified the seasonality of flower visitors, the temporal transition of floral resources, and the variation in pollination success of alpine plants in northern Japan. Bumble bees, syrphid flies, and non-syrphid flies were the predominant flower visitors. Foraging activity of bumble bees increased toward the late flowering period reflecting the life cycle of colony development. The activity of syrphid flies was sensitive to ambient temperature, while that of non-syrphid flies remained high throughout the season. Flower production of bee-pollinated plants fluctuated significantly between years with a bimodal pattern peaking in the early and late periods, while flower production of fly-pollinated plants was less variable between years. Fruit-set success of bee-pollinated plants increased considerably from the early to the late flowering period, while the trend for fly-pollinated plants was less marked. Three times more visits of dipteran insects are necessary for fly-pollinated plants to achieve fruiting success comparable to bee-pollinated plants. Bumble bees are potentially excellent pollinators, but the visitation frequency is low early in the season. Lower pollination ability of dipteran insects may be compensated for by abundant flower visits. The relationships between flowering phenology and fruit-set success of alpine plant communities highly depend on the type of pollinators.
Rights: The final publication is available at link.springer.com
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/71818
Appears in Collections:環境科学院・地球環境科学研究院 (Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 工藤 岳

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