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The effects of a subsequent jump on the knee abduction angle during the early landing phase

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/72034

Title: The effects of a subsequent jump on the knee abduction angle during the early landing phase
Authors: Ishida, Tomoya Browse this author
Koshino, Yuta Browse this author
Yamanaka, Masanori Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Ueno, Ryo Browse this author
Taniguchi, Shohei Browse this author
Samukawa, Mina Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Saito, Hiroshi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Matsumoto, Hisashi Browse this author
Aoki, Yoshimitsu Browse this author
Tohyama, Harukazu Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Anterior cruciate ligament
Biomechanics
Risk factor
Prevention
Knee injury
Sex difference
Issue Date: 20-Oct-2018
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal Title: BMC musculoskeletal disorders
Volume: 19
Start Page: 379
Publisher DOI: 10.1186/s12891-018-2291-4
PMID: 30342498
Abstract: BackgroundA double-leg landing with or without a subsequent jump is commonly used to evaluate the neuromuscular control of knee abduction. However, the differences in frontal plane knee biomechanics between landings with and without a subsequent jump are not well known. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a subsequent jump on knee abduction, including during the early landing phase, in female and male subjects.MethodsTwenty-one female subjects and 21 male subjects participated. All subjects performed drop landing task (a landing without a subsequent jump) and drop vertical jump task (a landing with a subsequent jump). The subjects landed from a 30-cm height. In drop vertical jump, the subjects also performed a maximum vertical jump immediately after landing. The knee abduction angle and moment were analyzed using a 3D motion analysis system. A two-way analysis of variance (task x time) was performed to examine the effects of a subsequent jump on the knee abduction angle during the early landing phase in female and male subjects. Another two-way analysis of variance (task x sex) was performed to compare peak knee abduction angles and moments.ResultsIn female subjects, the knee abduction angle was significantly greater during drop vertical jump than during drop landing, as measured 45 to 80ms after initial contact (P<0.05). Significant task-dependent effects in the peak knee abduction angle (P=0.001) and the abduction moment (P=0.029) were detected. The peak knee abduction angle and the abduction moment were greater during drop vertical jump than during drop landing.ConclusionsSubsequent jumps cause greater knee abduction during the early landing phase only in female subjects. This finding may relate to the sex discrepancy in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Additionally, the presence of a subsequent jump significantly increases the peak knee abduction angle and the peak knee abduction moment during landings. Therefore, compared with a landing task without a subsequent jump (drop landing), a landing task with a subsequent jump (drop vertical jump) may be advantageous for screening for knee abduction control, especially in female athletes.
Rights: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/72034
Appears in Collections:保健科学院・保健科学研究院 (Graduate School of Health Sciences / Faculty of Health Sciences) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 石田 知也

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