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Contamination by neonicotinoid insecticides and their metabolites in Sri Lankan black tea leaves and Japanese green tea leaves

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Title: Contamination by neonicotinoid insecticides and their metabolites in Sri Lankan black tea leaves and Japanese green tea leaves
Authors: Ikenaka, Yoshinori Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Fujioka, Kazutoshi Browse this author
Kawakami, Tomonori Browse this author
Ichise, Takahiro Browse this author
Bortey-Sam, Nesta Browse this author
Nakayama, Shouta M. M. Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Mizukawa, Hazuki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Taira, Kumiko Browse this author
Takahashi, Keisuke Browse this author
Kato, Keisuke Browse this author
Arizono, Koji Browse this author
Ishizuka, Mayumi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Neonicotinoid
Tea
Japan
Sri Lanka
Dinotefuran
Issue Date: 2018
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal Title: Toxicology reports
Volume: 5
Start Page: 744
End Page: 749
Publisher DOI: 10.1016/j.toxrep.2018.06.008
Abstract: Tea is one of the world's most popular beverages due to health promoting effects. Despite these, there have been concerns about the adverse effects of tea contamination by neonicotinoid insecticides. Only a handful of studies on neonicotinoid insecticides in tea have been carried out and this study was therefore performed to determine the concentrations of seven neonicotinoid insecticides and 20 metabolites in Japanese green tea leaves, and black tea leaves from Sri Lanka; and assess the Maximum Daily Intake (MDI) of neonicotinoid insecticides. From the results, the seven parent compounds were detected in Japanese tea leaves and beverages. Dinotefuran (3004 ng/g) was found at the highest level in green tea leaves. Ten of the 20 metabolites were detected in Japanese tea products. Dinotefuran-urea (92%) and thiacloprid-amide (89%) were most frequently detected in Japanese tea leaves. Clothianidin-urea (100 ng/g) was found at the highest level in green tea leaves. Neonicotinoid insecticides and metabolites were not detected in Sri Lankan black tea leaves. The concentrations and MDI of neonicotinoid insecticides in tea leaves were below the Maximum Residual Levels (MRLs) and Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs), respectively.
Rights: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/72465
Appears in Collections:獣医学院・獣医学研究院 (Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine / Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 池中 良徳

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