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Seasonality in spatial distribution : Climate and land use have contrasting effects on the species richness of breeding and wintering birds

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Title: Seasonality in spatial distribution : Climate and land use have contrasting effects on the species richness of breeding and wintering birds
Authors: Kawamura, Kazuhiro Browse this author
Yamaura, Yuichi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Senzaki, Masayuki Browse this author
Ueta, Mutsuyuki Browse this author
Nakamura, Futoshi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: forest birds
grassland birds
migration
snow depth
surrounding habitat
temperature
Issue Date: Jul-2019
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Journal Title: Ecology and evolution
Volume: 9
Issue: 13
Start Page: 7549
End Page: 7561
Publisher DOI: 10.1002/ece3.5286
Abstract: Aim Many studies have examined large-scale distributions of various taxa and their drivers, emphasizing the importance of climate, topography, and land use. Most studies have dealt with distributions over a single season or annually without considering seasonality. However, animal distributions and their drivers can differ among seasons because many animals migrate to suitable climates and areas with abundant prey resources. We aim to clarify seasonality in bird distributions and their drivers. Location Japan. Methods We examined the effects of climate (annual mean temperature, snow depth), topography (elevation), and land use (extent of surrounding habitat) on bird species richness, in the breeding and wintering seasons separately, using nationwide data (254 forest and 43 grassland sites, respectively). We separately analyzed the species richness of all species, residents, short-, and long-distance migrants in forests and grasslands. Results In the breeding season, the annual mean temperature negatively affected all groups (except for forest and grassland residents), and the extent of surrounding habitat positively affected many groups. By contrast, in the wintering season, temperature positively affected all groups (except for forest residents), and the extent of surrounding habitat positively affected only grassland long-distance migrants. In both seasons, the species richness of forest and grassland residents was high in regions of moderate and high temperature, respectively. Moreover, snow depth negatively affected all forest groups in the wintering season. Mapping expected species richness suggested that regions with different climates served as habitats for different groups during different seasons. Main conclusions All regions were important bird habitats depending on the season, reflecting the contrasting effects of temperature across seasons. In the breeding season, surrounding land use was also an important driver. To understand the seasonal role that each region and environment plays in maintaining species/communities, a large-scale study considering both environmental seasonality and species distribution is needed.
Rights: Seasonality in spatial distribution: Climate and land use have contrasting effects on the species richness of breeding and wintering birds. Kazuhiro Kawamura, Yuichi Yamaura, Masayuki Senzaki, Mutsuyuki Ueta, Futoshi Nakamura. Ecology and evolution 9(13). Copyright (c) 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/75282
Appears in Collections:農学院・農学研究院 (Graduate School of Agriculture / Faculty of Agriculture) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

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