HUSCAP logo Hokkaido Univ. logo

Hokkaido University Collection of Scholarly and Academic Papers >
Institute of Low Temperature Science >
Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc >

Tide-modulated ice motion and seismicity of a floating glacier tongue in East Antarctica

This item is licensed under: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

Files in This Item:

The file(s) associated with this item can be obtained from the following URL:https://doi.org/10.1017/aog.2019.25


Title: Tide-modulated ice motion and seismicity of a floating glacier tongue in East Antarctica
Authors: Minowa, Masahiro Browse this author
Podolskiy, Evgeny A. Browse this author
Sugiyama, Shin Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Antarctic glaciology
ice shelves
ice dynamics
Seismicity
Issue Date: Sep-2019
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Journal Title: Annals of glaciology
Volume: 60
Issue: 79
Start Page: 57
End Page: 67
Publisher DOI: 10.1017/aog.2019.25
Abstract: We recorded the ice motion and icequakes on the floating part of Langhovde Glacier in East Antarctica to better understand the dynamic behavior of ice shelves and floating tongues. Diurnal and semi-diurnal variations in ice motion and seismicity were simultaneously observed at all four global navigation satellite system and three seismic stations over 2 weeks. The short-term along-flow ice motion is explained by the elastic response of the glacier to ocean tide-induced hydrostatic stress variations, which decayed at a rate of 0.8 km(-1) toward the grounding line. We observed a large number of icequakes during mid-rising and high tides that covered a broad frequency range and formed two major groups of events centered at 10 and 120 Hz, respectively. The hourly occurrence rates were similar to 500 events h(-1), with the observed seismicity consistent with fracture due to floating tongue bending. We also observed minor secondary peaks at high ice speeds, which could reflect surface cracking due to stretching or basal friction. Our observation demonstrates that tidal-modulation was the main factor to fracture the floating tongue of Langhovde Glacier.
Rights: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/75671
Appears in Collections:低温科学研究所 (Institute of Low Temperature Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Export metadata:

OAI-PMH ( junii2 , jpcoar )

MathJax is now OFF:


 

 - Hokkaido University