HUSCAP logo Hokkaido Univ. logo

Hokkaido University Collection of Scholarly and Academic Papers >
Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine / Faculty of Veterinary Medicine >
Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research >
Volume 67 Number 4 >

Epidemiological study of sarcoptic mange in raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides albus) in Hokkaido, Japan

Files in This Item:
JJVR67-4-MarikoSASHIKA.pdf447.93 kBPDFView/Open
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://doi.org/10.14943/jjvr.67.4.253

Title: Epidemiological study of sarcoptic mange in raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides albus) in Hokkaido, Japan
Authors: Sashika, Mariko Browse this author
Abe, Go Browse this author
Nakai, Mariko Browse this author
Osaki, Aya Browse this author
Fujimoto, Ayako Browse this author
Tsubota, Toshio Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: population density
raccoon dog
sarcoptic mange
Sarcoptes scabiei
Issue Date: Nov-2019
Publisher: Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University
Journal Title: Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume: 67
Issue: 4
Start Page: 253
End Page: 261
Abstract: Sarcoptic mange is a pruritic skin disease caused by Sarcoptes scabiei, and can impact wildlife populations. In Japan, sarcoptic mange has rapidly spread among medium-sized mammals, especially raccoon dogs, since the 1980s, and can cause regional extinction. We conducted an epidemiological survey on sarcoptic mange in raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides albus) at two different sampling sites (Nopporo and Mukawa) in Hokkaido, Japan. We captured raccoon dogs using box traps in Nopporo from 2003 to 2018, and collected raccoon dog carcasses in Mukawa from 2005 to 2010; we investigated whether they were infested with S. scabiei. In Nopporo, sarcoptic mange incidences were detected from 2003 to 2004 and from 2016 to 2018, when the raccoon dog population density was high. Subsequently, the number of captured raccoon dogs decreased. Alternatively, when the raccoon dog population density was low, no S. scabiei-infested raccoon dogs were detected except in 2010. In 2010, three S. scabiei-infested raccoon dogs were captured at the southern end of the forest, and these individuals were subsequently confirmed to have died. Because they did not enter the central region of the forest, the incidence was localized. In Mukawa, 240 raccoon dogs were captured, of which 60 were infested with S. scabiei from 2005 to 2010, and a decrease in the number of captured raccoon dogs was confirmed after the sarcoptic mange epidemic. In conclusion, the increased population density might have resulted in the incidence of sarcoptic mange in raccoon dogs, and sarcoptic mange possibly impacted raccoon dog population density.
Type: bulletin (article)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/76204
Appears in Collections:Japanese Journal of Veterinary Research > Volume 67 Number 4

Submitter: 獣医学部図書室

Export metadata:

OAI-PMH ( junii2 , jpcoar )

MathJax is now OFF:


 

Feedback - Hokkaido University