HUSCAP logo Hokkaido Univ. logo

Hokkaido University Collection of Scholarly and Academic Papers >
Research Center for Zoonosis Control >
Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc >

Estimating Transmission Potential of H5N1 Viruses Among Humans in Egypt Using Phylogeny, Genetic Distance and Sampling Time Interval

This item is licensed under: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

Files in This Item:

The file(s) associated with this item can be obtained from the following URL:https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.02765


Title: Estimating Transmission Potential of H5N1 Viruses Among Humans in Egypt Using Phylogeny, Genetic Distance and Sampling Time Interval
Authors: Mohamed, Wessam Browse this author
Ito, Kimihito Browse this author
Omori, Ryosuke Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: avian influenza
Egypt
human-to-human transmission
R-0
statistical model
Issue Date: 3-Dec-2019
Publisher: Frontiers Media
Journal Title: Frontiers in microbiology
Volume: 10
Start Page: 2765
Publisher DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2019.02765
Abstract: In 2014 and 2015, the number of human cases of H5N1 avian influenza virus infections had increased dramatically in Egypt. This increase might be related to increase in the transmission potential of the virus among humans. To clarify the cause of the increase in H5N1 human cases, we investigate the transmissibility of H5N1 viruses among humans via estimating the basic reproduction number R-0 using nucleotide sequences and sampling dates of viruses. To this end, full-length hemagglutinin gene sequences of human and avian H5N1 influenza viruses isolated from 2006 to 2016 in Egypt were obtained from the NCBI influenza virus resource. Taking into account the phylogeny, genetic distance, sampling time difference among viruses, R-0 was estimated to be 0.05 (95% CI: 0.01, 0.13) assuming that human-to-human transmissions occurred within a city, 0.23(95% CI: 0.14, 0.35) assuming human-to-human transmissions among cities. Our results indicate that human-to-human transmission of H5N1 viruses in Egypt is limited, and the large increase in human cases is likely attributed to other factor than increase in human-to-human transmission potential.
Rights: Copyright © 2019 Mohamed, Ito and Omori.
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/76628
Appears in Collections:人獣共通感染症リサーチセンター (Research Center for Zoonosis Control) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Export metadata:

OAI-PMH ( junii2 , jpcoar )

MathJax is now OFF:


 

 - Hokkaido University