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Sudden bilateral vision loss due to third ventricular cavernous angioma with intratumoral hemorrhage - case report

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Title: Sudden bilateral vision loss due to third ventricular cavernous angioma with intratumoral hemorrhage - case report
Authors: Ishijima, Kan Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Shinmei, Yasuhiro Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Nozaki, Mayo Browse this author
Yamaguchi, Shigeru Browse this author
Chin, Shinki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Ishida, Susumu Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Sudden bilateral vision loss
Third ventricular cavernous angioma
Intratumoral hemorrhage
Chiasmal syndrome
Contrast-enhanced MRI
Issue Date: 16-Dec-2019
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal Title: BMC ophthalmology
Volume: 19
Issue: 1
Start Page: 259
Publisher DOI: 10.1186/s12886-019-1252-5
Abstract: Background: We report a rare case of sudden bilateral vision loss due to third ventricular cavernous angioma with intratumoral hemorrhage. Case presentation: A 45-year-old woman presented decreased visual acuity in both eyes. Her best corrected visual acuity was 0.1 in the right eye and 0.15 in the left eye. Goldmann perimetry showed bilateral central scotomas and bitemporal visual field defects. MRI demonstrated a lesion with mixed hypo- and hyperintensity at the optic chiasm, which was thought to be an intratumoral hemorrhage. The patient underwent bifrontal craniotomy. The tumor was exposed via an anterior interhemispheric approach, and histological evaluation of the mass led to a diagnosis of cavernous angioma. Six months after the surgery, her best corrected visual acuity was 0.9 in the right eye and 0.9 in the left, with slight bitemporal visual field defects. Conclusion: Third ventricular cavernous angioma is considered in the differential diagnosis of chiasmal syndrome. Contrast-enhanced MRI and FDG-PET might be useful for differential diagnosis of cavernous angioma from other chiasmal tumors including glioblastoma.
Rights: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/76810
Appears in Collections:医学院・医学研究院 (Graduate School of Medicine / Faculty of Medicine) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

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