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The Role of Different Earthworm Species (Metaphire Hilgendorfi and Eisenia Fetida) on CO₂ Emissions and Microbial Biomass during Barley Decomposition

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Title: The Role of Different Earthworm Species (Metaphire Hilgendorfi and Eisenia Fetida) on CO₂ Emissions and Microbial Biomass during Barley Decomposition
Authors: Hamamoto, Toru Browse this author
Uchida, Yoshitaka Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: epigeic earthworm
soil carbon
soil nitrogen
soil enzyme activity
agricultural soil
Issue Date: 20-Nov-2019
Publisher: MDPI
Journal Title: Sustainability
Volume: 11
Issue: 23
Start Page: 6544
Publisher DOI: 10.3390/su11236544
Abstract: Earthworms are commonly known as essential modifiers of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, but the effects of their species on nutrient cycles and interaction with soil microbial activities during the decomposition of organic materials remain unclear. We conducted an incubation experiment to investigate the effect of two different epigeic earthworms (M. hilgendorfi and E. fetida) on C and N concentrations and related enzyme activities in agricultural soils with added barley residues (ground barley powder). To achieve this, four treatments were included; (1) M. hilgendorfi and barley, (2) E. fetida and barley, (3) barley without earthworms, and (4) without earthworms and without barley. After 32 days incubation, we measured soil pH, inorganic N, microbial biomass C (MBC), water or hot-water soluble C, and soil enzyme activities. We also measured CO₂ emissions during the incubation. Our results indicated the earthworm activity in soils had no effect on the cumulative CO₂ emissions. However, M. hilgendorfi had a potential to accumulate MBC (2.9 g kg⁻¹ soil) and nitrate-N (39 mg kg⁻¹ soil), compared to E. fetida (2.5 g kg⁻¹ soil and 14 mg kg⁻¹ soil, respectively). In conclusion, the interaction between soil microbes and earthworm is influenced by earthworm species, consequently influencing the soil C and N dynamics.
Rights: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/76815
Appears in Collections:農学院・農学研究院 (Graduate School of Agriculture / Faculty of Agriculture) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

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