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Ice core records of levoglucosan and dehydroabietic and vanillic acids from Aurora Peak in Alaska since the 1660s: a proxy signal of biomass-burning activities in the North Pacific Rim

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Title: Ice core records of levoglucosan and dehydroabietic and vanillic acids from Aurora Peak in Alaska since the 1660s: a proxy signal of biomass-burning activities in the North Pacific Rim
Authors: Pokhrel, Ambarish Browse this author
Kawamura, Kimitaka Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Kunwar, Bhagawati Browse this author
Ono, Kaori Browse this author
Tsushima, Akane Browse this author
Seki, Osamu Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Matoba, Sumito Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Shiraiwa, Takayuki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Issue Date: 17-Jan-2020
Publisher: Copernicus Publications
Journal Title: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Volume: 20
Issue: 1
Start Page: 597
End Page: 612
Publisher DOI: 10.5194/acp-20-597-2020
Abstract: A 180m long (343 years) ice core was drilled in the saddle of Aurora Peak in Alaska (63.52 degrees N, 146.54 degrees W; elevation: 2825 m) and studied for biomass-burning tracers. Concentrations of levoglucosan and dehydroabietic and vanillic acids exhibit multidecadal variability, with higher spikes in 1678, 1692, 1695, 1716, 1750, 1764, 1756, 1834, 1898, 1913, 1966 and 2005 CE. Historical trends of these compounds showed enhanced biomass-burning activities in the deciduous broadleaf forests, boreal conifer forests, and/or tundra woodland and mountain ecosystems before the 1830s and after the Great Pacific Climate Shift (GPCS). The gradually elevated level of dehydroabietic acid after the GPCS is similar to p-hydroxybenzoic acid (p-HBA) from the Svalbard ice core, suggesting common climate variability in the Northern Hemisphere. The periodic cycle of levoglucosan, which seemed to be associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), may be more involved with the longrange atmospheric transport than other species. These compounds showed significant correlations with global lowertropospheric temperature anomalies (GLTTAs). The relations of the biomass-burning tracers with the PDO and GLTTA in this study suggest that their emission, frequency and deposition are controlled by the climate-driven forces. In addition, historical trends of dehydroabietic and vanillic acids (burning products of resin and lignin, respectively) from our ice core demonstrate the Northern Hemispheric connections to the common source regions as suggested from other ice core studies from Svalbard, Akademii Nauk and Tunu Greenland in the Northern Hemisphere.
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/76860
Appears in Collections:低温科学研究所 (Institute of Low Temperature Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 白岩 孝行

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