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Does Ozone Alter the Attractiveness of Japanese White Birch Leaves to the Leaf Beetle Agelastica coerulea via Changes in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) : An Examination with the Y-Tube Test

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Title: Does Ozone Alter the Attractiveness of Japanese White Birch Leaves to the Leaf Beetle Agelastica coerulea via Changes in Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) : An Examination with the Y-Tube Test
Authors: Masui, Noboru Browse this author
Mochizuki, Tomoki Browse this author
Tani, Akira Browse this author
Matsuura, Hideyuki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Agathokleous, Evgenios Browse this author
Watanabe, Toshihiro Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Koike, Takayoshi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: atmospheric lifetime
biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs)
herbivorous insects
leaf beetle
olfactory response
ozone
Issue Date: 2-Jan-2020
Publisher: MDPI
Journal Title: Forests
Volume: 11
Issue: 1
Start Page: 58
Publisher DOI: 10.3390/f11010058
Abstract: Elevated ground-level ozone (O₃) reduced C-based defense chemicals; however, severe grazing damages were found in leaves grown in the low O₃ condition of a free air O₃-concentration enrichment (O₃-FACE) system. To explain this phenomenon, this study investigates the role of BVOCs (biogenic volatile organic compounds) as signaling compounds for insect herbivores. BVOCs act as scents for herbivore insects to locate host plants, while some BVOCs show high reactivity to O₃, inducing changes in the composition of BVOCs in atmospheres with elevated O₃. To assess the aforementioned phenomenon, profiles of BVOCs emitted from birch (Betula platyphylla var. japonica Hara) leaves were analyzed ex situ, and Y-tube insect preference tests were conducted in vitro to study the insect olfactory response. The assays were conducted in June and August or September, according to the life cycle of the adult alder leaf beetle Agelastica coerulea Baly (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). The Y-tube tests revealed that the leaf beetles were attracted to BVOCs, and O₃ per se had neither an attractant nor a repellent effect. BVOCs became less attractant when mixed with highly concentrated O₃ (>80 ppb). About 20% of the total BVOCs emitted were highly O₃-reactive compounds, such as beta-ocimene. The results suggest that BVOCs emitted from the birch leaves can be altered by elevated O₃, thus potentially reducing the attractiveness of leaves to herbivorous insects searching for food.
Rights: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/77116
Appears in Collections:農学院・農学研究院 (Graduate School of Agriculture / Faculty of Agriculture) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

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