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Lead and cadmium excretion in feces and urine of children from polluted townships near a lead-zinc mine in Kabwe, Zambia

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Title: Lead and cadmium excretion in feces and urine of children from polluted townships near a lead-zinc mine in Kabwe, Zambia
Authors: Yabe, John Browse this author
Nakayama, Shouta M. M. Browse this author
Ikenaka, Yoshinori Browse this author
Yohannes, Yared B. Browse this author
Bortey-Sam, Nesta Browse this author
Kabalo, Abel Nketani Browse this author
Ntapisha, John Browse this author
Mizukawa, Hazuki Browse this author
Umemura, Takashi Browse this author
Ishizuka, Mayumi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: Lead
Cadmium
Excretion
Children's health
Kabwe
Zambia
Issue Date: Jul-2018
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal Title: Chemosphere
Volume: 202
Start Page: 48
End Page: 55
Publisher DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2018.03.079
PMID: 29554507
Abstract: Lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are toxic metals that exist ubiquitously in the environment. Children in polluted areas are particularly vulnerable to metal exposure, where clinical signs and symptoms could be nonspecific. Absorbed metals are excreted primarily in urine and reflect exposure from all sources. We analyzed Pb and Cd concentrations in blood, feces and urine of children from polluted townships near a lead-zinc mine in Kabwe, Zambia, to determine concurrent childhood exposure to the metals. Moreover, the study determined the Pb and Cd relationships among urine, feces and blood as well as accessed the potential of urine and fecal analysis for biomonitoring of Pb and Cd exposure in children. Fecal Pb (up to 2252 mg/kg, dry weight) and urine Pb (up to 2914 mu g/L) were extremely high. Concentrations of Cd in blood (Cd-B) of up to 7.7 mu g/L, fecal (up to 4.49 mg/kg, dry weight) and urine (up to 18.1 mu g/L) samples were elevated. metal levels were higher in younger children (0-3 years old) than older children (4-7). Positive correlations were recorded for Pb and Cd among blood, urine and fecal samples whereas negative correlations were recorded with age. These findings indicate children are exposed to both metals at their current home environment. Moreover, urine and feces could be useful for biomonitoring of metals due to their strong relationships with blood levels. There is need to conduct a clinical evaluation of the affected children to fully appreciate the health impact of these metal exposure. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Rights: ©2018. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/78798
Appears in Collections:獣医学院・獣医学研究院 (Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine / Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 石塚 真由美

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