HUSCAP logo Hokkaido Univ. logo

Hokkaido University Collection of Scholarly and Academic Papers >
Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science >
Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc >

Reconstructing the History of Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF) in the Kanchenjunga Conservation Area, East Nepal: An Interdisciplinary Approach

This item is licensed under: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

Files in This Item:

The file(s) associated with this item can be obtained from the following URL:https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135407


Title: Reconstructing the History of Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF) in the Kanchenjunga Conservation Area, East Nepal: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Authors: Byers, Alton C. Browse this author
Chand, Mohan Bahadur Browse this author
Lala, Jonathan Browse this author
Shrestha, Milan Browse this author
Byers, Elizabeth A. Browse this author
Watanabe, Teiji Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF)
Kanchenjunga
Nepal
interdisciplinary approaches
Issue Date: Jul-2020
Publisher: MDPI
Journal Title: Sustainability
Volume: 12
Issue: 13
Start Page: 5407
Publisher DOI: 10.3390/su12135407
Abstract: An interdisciplinary field investigation of historic glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) in the Kanchenjunga region of Nepal was conducted between April and May, 2019. Oral history and field measurements suggested that at least six major GLOFs have occurred in the region since 1921. A remote sensing analysis confirmed the occurrence of the six GLOFs mentioned by informants, including two smaller flood events not mentioned that had occurred at some point before 1962. A numerical simulation of the Nangama GLOF suggested that it was triggered by an ice/debris avalanche of some 800,000 m³ of material, causing a surge wave that breached the terminal moraine and released an estimated 11.2 x 10⁶ m³± 1.4 x 10⁶ m³ of water. Debris from the flood dammed the Pabuk Khola river 2 km below the lake to form what is today known as Chheche Pokhari lake. Some concern has been expressed for the possibility of a second GLOF from Nangama as the result of continued and growing landslide activity from its right lateral moraine. Regular monitoring of all lakes and glaciers is recommended to avoid and/or mitigate the occurrence of future GLOF events in the region. Collectively, the paper demonstrates the benefits and utility of interdisciplinary research approaches to achieving a better understanding of past and poorly documented GLOF events in remote, data-scarce high mountain environments.
Rights: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/79223
Appears in Collections:環境科学院・地球環境科学研究院 (Graduate School of Environmental Science / Faculty of Environmental Earth Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Export metadata:

OAI-PMH ( junii2 , jpcoar )

MathJax is now OFF:


 

 - Hokkaido University