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Strong ice-ocean interaction beneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica

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Title: Strong ice-ocean interaction beneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica
Authors: Hirano, Daisuke Browse this author
Tamura, Takeshi Browse this author
Kusahara, Kazuya Browse this author
Ohshima, Kay I. Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Nicholls, Keith W. Browse this author
Ushio, Shuki Browse this author
Simizu, Daisuke Browse this author
Ono, Kazuya Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Fujii, Masakazu Browse this author
Nogi, Yoshifumi Browse this author
Aoki, Shigeru Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Issue Date: 24-Aug-2020
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Journal Title: Nature communications
Volume: 11
Issue: 1
Start Page: 4221
Publisher DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-17527-4
Abstract: Mass loss from the Antarctic ice sheet, Earth's largest freshwater reservoir, results directly in global sea-level rise and Southern Ocean freshening. Observational and modeling studies have demonstrated that ice shelf basal melting, resulting from the inflow of warm water onto the Antarctic continental shelf, plays a key role in the ice sheet's mass balance. In recent decades, warm ocean-cryosphere interaction in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas has received a great deal of attention. However, except for Totten Ice Shelf, East Antarctic ice shelves typically have cold ice cavities with low basal melt rates. Here we present direct observational evidence of high basal melt rates (7-16myr(-1)) beneath an East Antarctic ice shelf, Shirase Glacier Tongue, driven by southward-flowing warm water guided by a deep continuous trough extending to the continental slope. The strength of the alongshore wind controls the thickness of the inflowing warm water layer and the rate of basal melting. East Antarctic ice shelves typically have cold ice cavities with low basal melt rates. Here the authors direct observational evidence of high basal melt rates beneath Shirase Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica, driven by inflowing warm water guided by a deep continuous trough extending to the continental slope.
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/79586
Appears in Collections:低温科学研究所 (Institute of Low Temperature Science) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

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