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Dining from the coast to the summit : Salmon and pine nuts determine the summer body condition of female brown bears on the Shiretoko Peninsula

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Title: Dining from the coast to the summit : Salmon and pine nuts determine the summer body condition of female brown bears on the Shiretoko Peninsula
Authors: Shirane, Yuri Browse this author
Jimbo, Mina Browse this author
Yamanaka, Masami Browse this author
Nakanishi, Masanao Browse this author
Mori, Fumihiko Browse this author
Ishinazaka, Tsuyoshi Browse this author
Sashika, Mariko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Tsubota, Toshio Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Shimozuru, Michito Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: body condition
brown bear
diet
nutritional status
reproductive status
Ursus arctos
Issue Date: 18-Mar-2021
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Journal Title: Ecology and evolution
Publisher DOI: 10.1002/ece3.7410
Abstract: Body condition in mammals fluctuates depending on energy intake and expenditure. For brown bears (Ursus arctos), high-protein foods facilitate efficient mass gain, while lipids and carbohydrates play important roles in adjusting dietary protein content to optimal levels to maximize energy intake. On the Shiretoko Peninsula, Hokkaido, Japan, brown bears have seasonal access to high-lipid pine nuts and high-protein salmon. To assess seasonal and annual fluctuation in the body condition of adult female brown bears in relation to diet and reproductive status, we conducted a longitudinal study in a special wildlife protection area on the Shiretoko Peninsula during 2012-2018. First, analyses of 2,079 bear scats revealed that pine nuts accounted for 39.8% of energy intake in August and salmon accounted for 46.1% in September and that their consumption by bears varied annually. Second, we calculated the ratio of torso height to torso length as an index of body condition from 1,226 photographs of 12 adult females. Results indicated that body condition continued to decline until late August and started to increase in September when salmon consumption increased. In addition, body condition began to recover earlier in years when consumption of both pine nuts and salmon was high. Furthermore, females with offspring had poorer body condition than solitary females, in particular in late August in years with low salmon consumption. Our findings suggest that coastal and subalpine foods, which are unique to the Shiretoko Peninsula, determine the summer body condition of female brown bears, as well as their survival and reproductive success.
Rights: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/81212
Appears in Collections:獣医学院・獣医学研究院 (Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine / Faculty of Veterinary Medicine) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

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