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Are the windows to the soul the same in the East and West? Cultural differences in using the eyes and mouth as cues to recognize emotions in Japan and the United States

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/22527

Title: Are the windows to the soul the same in the East and West? Cultural differences in using the eyes and mouth as cues to recognize emotions in Japan and the United States
Authors: Yuki, Masaki Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Maddux, William W. Browse this author
Masuda, Takahiko Browse this author
Keywords: Culture
Emotions
Facial expressions
Emotion recognition
Cognition
Issue Date: Mar-2007
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal Title: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume: 43
Issue: 2
Start Page: 303
End Page: 311
Publisher DOI: 10.1016/j.jesp.2006.02.004
Abstract: The current research investigated the hypothesis that, depending on an individual’s cultural background, facial cues in different parts of the face are weighted differently when interpreting emotions. Given that the eyes are more difficult to control than the mouth when people express emotions, we predicted that individuals in cultures where emotional subduction is the norm (such as Japan) would focus more strongly on the eyes than the mouth when interpreting others’ emotions. By contrast, we predicted that people in cultures where overt emotional expression is the norm (such as the US) would tend to interpret emotions based on the position of the mouth, because it is the most expressive part of the face. This hypothesis was confirmed in two studies, one using illustrated faces, and one using edited facial expressions from real people, in which emotional expressions in the eyes and mouth were independently manipulated. Implications for our understanding of cross-cultural psychology, as well of the psychology of emotional interpretation, are discussed.
Relation: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00221031
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/22527
Appears in Collections:文学院・文学研究院 (Graduate School of Humanities and Human Sciences / Faculty of Humanities and Human Sciences) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 結城 雅樹

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