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In-situ transmission electron microscopy of conductive filaments in NiO resistance random access memory and its analysis

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/52748

Title: In-situ transmission electron microscopy of conductive filaments in NiO resistance random access memory and its analysis
Authors: Fujii, Takashi Browse this author
Arita, Masashi Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Hamada, Kouichi Browse this author
Takahashi, Yasuo Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Sakaguchi, Norihito Browse this author
Issue Date: 28-Feb-2013
Publisher: American Institute of Physics
Journal Title: Journal of Applied Physics
Volume: 113
Issue: 8
Publisher DOI: 10.1063/1.4792732
Abstract: We used thermal oxidization at various temperatures to prepare NiO/Pr-Ir for use in resistance random access memory (ReRAM) samples. In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to investigate the forming process of these ReRAM samples, where a needle-shaped top electrode of Pt-Ir was attached to the NiO/Pt-Ir ReRAM layer. The forming voltage initializing the NiO layer increased at an oxidization temperature of between 200 and 400 degrees C. In this process, conductive bridges, which are thought to be conductive filaments of a ReRAM, appeared, and their sizes showed a correlation with the injection power. It was as small as about 300 nm(2) when the injection power was 10(-6) W. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to analyze the bridge, and it was experimentally confirmed that the oxygen content of the bridge was lower than that of the initial NiO layer. However, these bridges in the low resistance state did not show further ReRAM switching to the high resistance state inside of a TEM instrument. To check the reason of this result, we investigated samples outside of the TEM instrument, which had similar geometry to that of TEM specimens. They showed the ReRAM switching in air ambient but not in vacuum. Combining these results inside and outside of the TEM instrument, it can be concluded that the existence of oxygen around the conductive filament plays an important role. This supports the filament redox model on the ReRAM operation. (C) 2013 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4792732]
Rights: Copyright 2013 American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics. The following article appeared in J. Appl. Phys. 113, 083701 (2013); doi: 10.1063/1.4792732 and may be found at https://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4792732
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/52748
Appears in Collections:情報科学院・情報科学研究院 (Graduate School of Information Science and Technology / Faculty of Information Science and Technology) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 高橋 庸夫

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