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Marine protected area restricts demographic connectivity: Dissimilarity in a marine environment can function as a biological barrier

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Title: Marine protected area restricts demographic connectivity: Dissimilarity in a marine environment can function as a biological barrier
Authors: Sato, Masaaki Browse this author
Honda, Kentaro Browse this author
Uy, Wilfredo H. Browse this author
Baslot, Darwin I. Browse this author
Genovia, Tom G. Browse this author
Nakamura, Yohei Browse this author
Bernardo, Lawrence Patrick C. Browse this author
Kurokochi, Hiroyuki Browse this author
Pantallano, Allyn Duvin S. Browse this author
Lian, Chunlan Browse this author
Nadaoka, Kazuo Browse this author
Nakaoka, Masahiro Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Keywords: coral reef fish
larval dispersal
microsatellites
parentage analysis
Philippines
Issue Date: Oct-2017
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Journal Title: Ecology and evolution
Volume: 7
Issue: 19
Start Page: 7859
End Page: 7871
Publisher DOI: 10.1002/ece3.3318
Abstract: The establishment of marine protected areas (MPAs) can often lead to environmental differences between MPAs and fishing zones. To determine the effects on marine dispersal of environmental dissimilarity between an MPA and fishing zone, we examined the abundance and recruitment patterns of two anemonefishes (Amphiprion frenatus and A.perideraion) that inhabit sea anemones in different management zones (i.e., an MPA and two fishing zones) by performing a field survey and a genetic parentage analysis. We found lower levels of abundance per anemone in the MPA compared to the fishing zones for both species (n=1,525 anemones, p=.032). The parentage analysis also showed that lower numbers of fishes were recruited from the fishing zones and outside of the study area into each anemone in the MPA than into each anemone in the fishing zones (n=1,525 anemones, p<.017). However, the number of self-recruit production per female did not differ between the MPA and fishing zones (n=384 females, p=.516). Because the ocean currents around the study site were unlikely to cause a lower settlement intensity of larvae in the MPA, the ocean circulation was not considered crucial to the observed abundance and recruitment patterns. Instead, stronger top-down control and/or a lower density of host anemones in the MPA were potential factors for such patterns. Our results highlight the importance of dissimilarity in a marine environment as a factor that affects connectivity.
Rights: Sato M, Honda K, Uy WH, et al. Marine protected area restricts demographic connectivity: Dissimilarity in a marine environment can function as a biological barrier. Ecol Evol. 2017;7:7859–7871. © 2017 The Authors.
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/67800
Appears in Collections:北方生物圏フィールド科学センター (Field Science Center for Northern Biosphere) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 仲岡 雅裕

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