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Recent fragmentation of the endangered Blakiston’s fish owl (Bubo blakistoni) population on Hokkaido Island, Northern Japan, Revealed by Mitochondrial DNA and Microsatellite Analyses

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タイトル: Recent fragmentation of the endangered Blakiston’s fish owl (Bubo blakistoni) population on Hokkaido Island, Northern Japan, Revealed by Mitochondrial DNA and Microsatellite Analyses
著者: Omote, Keita 著作を一覧する
Nishida, Chizuko 著作を一覧する
Takenaka, Takeshi 著作を一覧する
Saito, Keisuke 著作を一覧する
Shimura, Ryohji 著作を一覧する
Fujimoto, Satoshi 著作を一覧する
Sato, Takao 著作を一覧する
Masuda, Ryuichi 著作を一覧する
キーワード: Bubo blakistoni
Genetic diversity
Microsatellite
Mitochondrial DNA haplotype
Population bottleneck
Population fragmentation
発行日: 2015年 4月29日
誌名: Zoological Letters
巻: 1
開始ページ: 16
出版社 DOI: 10.1186/s40851-015-0014-3
抄録: Introduction Blakiston’s fish owl (Bubo blakistoni) was previously widespread on Hokkaido Island, Japan, but is now distributed only in limited forest areas. The population size on Hokkaido decreased during the 20th century due to reduction and fragmentation of the owl’s habitat. To elucidate temporal and spatial changes in population structure and genetic diversity, we analyzed 439 individuals collected over the last 100 years. Results We detected a population bottleneck and fragmentation event indicated by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotype and microsatellite analyses. The lowest value for effective population size, which was estimated by moment and temporal methods from microsatellite data, occurred in the 1980s. Five haplotypes were found in the mtDNA control region; most haplotypes were previously widespread across Hokkaido, but have become fixed in separate areas after the bottleneck period. Genetic differentiation among local populations, as indicated by both mtDNA and microsatellite data, likely arose through population fragmentation. Conclusions The owl population may have been divided into limited areas due to loss of habitats via human activities, and have lost genetic variability within the local populations through inbreeding. Our mtDNA and microsatellite data show that genetic diversity decreased in local populations, indicating the importance of individuals moving between areas for conservation of this species on Hokkaido.
資料タイプ: article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/68298
出現コレクション:雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

提供者: 増田 隆一

 

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