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Removals of pesticides and pesticide transformation products during drinking water treatment processes and their impact on mutagen formation potential after chlorination

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Title: Removals of pesticides and pesticide transformation products during drinking water treatment processes and their impact on mutagen formation potential after chlorination
Authors: Matsushita, Taku Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Morimoto, Ayako Browse this author
Kuriyama, Taisuke Browse this author
Matsumoto, Eisuke Browse this author
Matsui, Yoshihiko Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Shirasaki, Nobutaka Browse this author
Kondo, Takashi Browse this author
Takanashi, Hirokazu Browse this author
Kameya, Takashi Browse this author
Keywords: Activated carbon adsorption
Coagulation and sedimentation
Disinfection by-product
Ozonation
Removal mechanisms
Toxicity
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2018
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal Title: Water research
Volume: 138
Start Page: 67
End Page: 76
Publisher DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2018.01.028
Abstract: Removal efficiencies of 28 pesticide transformation products (TPs) and 15 parent pesticides during steps in drinking water treatment (coagulation-sedimentation, activated carbon adsorption, and ozonation) were estimated via laboratory-scale batch experiments, and the mechanisms underlying the removal at each step were elucidated via regression analyses. The removal via powdered activated carbon (PAC) treatment was correlated positively with the log K-ow at pH 7. The adjusted coefficient of determination (r(2)) increased when the energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) was added as an explanatory variable, the suggestion being that adsorption onto PAC particles was largely governed by hydrophobic interactions. The residual error could be partly explained by pi-pi electron donor-acceptor interactions between the graphene surface of the PAC particles and the adsorbates. The removal via ozonation correlated positively with the energy level of the HOMO, probably because compounds with relatively high energy level HOMOs could more easily transfer an electron to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of ozone. Overall, the TPs tended to be more difficult to remove via PAC adsorption and ozonation than their parent pesticides. However, the TPs that were difficult to remove via PAC adsorption did not induce strong mutagenicity after chlorination, and the TPs that were associated with strong mutagenicity after chlorination could be removed via PAC adsorption. Therefore, PAC adsorption is hypothesized to be an effective method of treating drinking water to reduce the possibility of postchlorination mutagenicity associated with both TPs and their parent pesticides.
Rights: © 2018. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/78769
Appears in Collections:工学院・工学研究院 (Graduate School of Engineering / Faculty of Engineering) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 松下 拓

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