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Modeling of light propagation in the human neck for diagnoses of thyroid cancers by diffuse optical tomography

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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:http://hdl.handle.net/2115/70062

Title: Modeling of light propagation in the human neck for diagnoses of thyroid cancers by diffuse optical tomography
Authors: Fujii, H. Browse this author →KAKEN DB
Yamada, Y. Browse this author
Kobayashi, K. Browse this author
Watanabe, M. Browse this author
Hoshi, Y. Browse this author
Keywords: diffuse optical tomography
light propagation in tissues
radiative transfer equation
thyroid cancers in human neck
Issue Date: May-2017
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
Journal Title: International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering
Volume: 33
Issue: 5
Start Page: e2826
Publisher DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2826
PMID: 27531832
Abstract: Diffuse optical tomography using near-infrared light in a wavelength range from 700 to 1000nm has the potential to enable non-invasive diagnoses of thyroid cancers; some of which are difficult to detect by conventional methods such as ultrasound tomography. Diffuse optical tomography needs to be based on a physically accurate model of light propagation in the neck, because it reconstructs tomographic images of the optical properties in the human neck by inverse analysis. Our objective here was to investigate the effects of three factors on light propagation in the neck using the 2D time-dependent radiative transfer equation: (1) the presence of the trachea, (2) the refractive-index mismatch at the trachea-tissue interface, and (3) the effect of neck organs other than the trachea (spine, spinal cord, and blood vessels). There was a significant influence of reflection and refraction at the trachea-tissue interface on the light intensities in the region between the trachea and the front of the neck surface. Organs other than the trachea showed little effect on the light intensities measured at the front of the neck surface although these organs affected the light intensities locally. These results indicated the necessity of modeling the refractive-index mismatch at the trachea-tissue interface and the possibility of modeling other neck organs simply as a homogeneous medium when the source and detectors were far from large blood vessels.
Rights: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering 33(5) May 2017 e2826, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cnm.2826/full. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Type: article (author version)
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2115/70062
Appears in Collections:工学院・工学研究院 (Graduate School of Engineering / Faculty of Engineering) > 雑誌発表論文等 (Peer-reviewed Journal Articles, etc)

Submitter: 藤井 宏之

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